Wandering to Nowhere

Art blocks really suck

All I wanna do is draw fluff but it feels like I have no energy

medioxumatepoet:

missionlameturtle:

andrysb24:

mandkips:

#and then he dies #and she starts killing people

Not to mention the whole damn town gets cursed

he doesn’t just DIE, he’s lynched because the Gaston-equivalent sees them together and the whole town is horribly racist and that’s why she starts killing people

I WILL DEFEND THESE TWO TO THE GRAVE

nayrosartrefs:

Some awesome leg tutorials done by n3m0s1s.

erengayer:

When you grow to like characters that you know are going to die. 

(◕‿◕✿) (◕﹏◕✿) (⊙﹏⊙✿)

impsexual:

The darkness is upon us.

clpdee:

finding out a friend passionately hates something you kinda like

image

caffeinatedfeminist:

I promise to never, ever post a Screamer on my blog.

This will be a safe place on April Fool’s Day.

nutastic:

I think Belle’s the most relateable Disney princess because she was ready to drop everything to go fuck a giant monster

tordles:

turtlesnjunk:

mirksilua:

I went on Facebook for the first time in months and got thought about TMNT. This is the result.

perfection

i love you

koala-meth:

lithuania:

is this riza hawkeye

oh MY GOD IT IS

koala-meth:

lithuania:

is this riza hawkeye

oh MY GOD IT IS

psuedofolio:

Vroom vroom

psuedofolio:

Vroom vroom

marras6:

petticoatruler:

So your friend has a chronic illness or disability…
don’t
expect them to be able to go out on a whim
expect them to have lives just like yours
expect them to always be available
demand details of their illness that they haven’t volunteered, ask them nicely and don’t badger
offer help or assistance to make yourself feel like a better person
act as though the disease is catching, repugnant, or disgusting
challenge them to do things they have already told you were impossible
baby them or treat them as though they’re less competent mentally
tell other people about their illness(es)
suggest cures/treatments/holistic practices (since, you know, they probably have already tried it)
Try to relate their problem to your experience - your sprained ankle is nothing like chronic pain, your bout with stomach flu is nothing like IBS, your inability to focus before coffee is nothing like the mental fog that comes with illnesses like fibromyalgia or MS
ever, ever, ever accuse them of faking. ever.
do
understand that some chronic illnesses have good days and bad days, and that there’s no way to predict what’ll happen
be supportive and understand their limitations
ask about dietary or physical restrictions if you are making plans with them
ask about anything that might make things worse for them, and take it into account
tell them that if they need to tell you they can’t do something that you won’t be angry at them for not being able to, and don’t be passive-aggressive about it
remember that they are a person, not an illness
listen to them, ask them questions if you don’t understand something, and remember what they say
I’m sure I’m forgetting something, but this seems like a decent start. Please add your own.

(Emphasis mine)
Cures people have suggested for curing my Ehlers-Danlos:
Yoga, pilates, boxing, horse riding, any physical activity really
Acupuncture
Swimming in frozen lakes
Using anti-aging creams, because those heal collagen, right
Shark cartilage tablets
Praying to god for a miracle
If you’re not a physiotherapist or doctor specialized in connective tissue problems, please shut up. 
Similarly, I was only diagnosed in adulthood so I was told for 10 year:
"it’s only growing pains"
"don’t be so lazy"
"it’s not a big deal, come on, get it done"
"your muscles are just sore from not being used to this sort of activity, you’ll get used to it" (every year in school skating classes when i cried from the pain of just having them on my feet, and more recently from people in charge of my benefits unemployability statements, causing me panic attacks. thanks.)
Don’t push and pressure and try to make me stuff if I say no. I have trouble refusing to do things especially in person or on the phone. Respect my knowledge of how my body works. At all times like 60% of my awareness is filled with aches and pains and fatigue and brainfog, I know when I need to stop. You don’t. 
And don’t ever talk to me about “breaking out of your comfort zone” or “it’s a matter of being positive” or “your own reactions can change the situations greatly!”
I’m outside my comfort zone every single day. Some days it’s going out to buy milk, some days it’s having to stand in shower, some days it’s being unable to hold my toothbrush in the morning.
I know my limits and have to break past them all the time to take care of my basic needs. 
Even worse is if you blackmail me to “encourage” me to do things. I don’t get enough material things or social interaction in the first place, don’t offer me those only in exchange for “effort” or  work i’m unable to do without breaking myself.
And those who tell me I shouldn’t take some medications (addictive pain relief, antidepressants etc), that’s a disgusting attitude. Please shut up. Eating superfoods and jogging and listening to music and meditating might help for your headaches and slumps but I’m ACTUALLY ILL. Positive thinking is really oppressive to people who have it worse.

marras6:

petticoatruler:

So your friend has a chronic illness or disability…

don’t

  • expect them to be able to go out on a whim
  • expect them to have lives just like yours
  • expect them to always be available
  • demand details of their illness that they haven’t volunteered, ask them nicely and don’t badger
  • offer help or assistance to make yourself feel like a better person
  • act as though the disease is catching, repugnant, or disgusting
  • challenge them to do things they have already told you were impossible
  • baby them or treat them as though they’re less competent mentally
  • tell other people about their illness(es)
  • suggest cures/treatments/holistic practices (since, you know, they probably have already tried it)
  • Try to relate their problem to your experience - your sprained ankle is nothing like chronic pain, your bout with stomach flu is nothing like IBS, your inability to focus before coffee is nothing like the mental fog that comes with illnesses like fibromyalgia or MS
  • ever, ever, ever accuse them of faking. ever.

do

  • understand that some chronic illnesses have good days and bad days, and that there’s no way to predict what’ll happen
  • be supportive and understand their limitations
  • ask about dietary or physical restrictions if you are making plans with them
  • ask about anything that might make things worse for them, and take it into account
  • tell them that if they need to tell you they can’t do something that you won’t be angry at them for not being able to, and don’t be passive-aggressive about it
  • remember that they are a person, not an illness
  • listen to them, ask them questions if you don’t understand something, and remember what they say

I’m sure I’m forgetting something, but this seems like a decent start. Please add your own.

(Emphasis mine)

Cures people have suggested for curing my Ehlers-Danlos:

  • Yoga, pilates, boxing, horse riding, any physical activity really
  • Acupuncture
  • Swimming in frozen lakes
  • Using anti-aging creams, because those heal collagen, right
  • Shark cartilage tablets
  • Praying to god for a miracle

If you’re not a physiotherapist or doctor specialized in connective tissue problems, please shut up. 

Similarly, I was only diagnosed in adulthood so I was told for 10 year:

  • "it’s only growing pains"
  • "don’t be so lazy"
  • "it’s not a big deal, come on, get it done"
  • "your muscles are just sore from not being used to this sort of activity, you’ll get used to it" (every year in school skating classes when i cried from the pain of just having them on my feet, and more recently from people in charge of my benefits unemployability statements, causing me panic attacks. thanks.)

Don’t push and pressure and try to make me stuff if I say no. I have trouble refusing to do things especially in person or on the phone. Respect my knowledge of how my body works. At all times like 60% of my awareness is filled with aches and pains and fatigue and brainfog, I know when I need to stop. You don’t. 

And don’t ever talk to me about “breaking out of your comfort zone” or “it’s a matter of being positive” or “your own reactions can change the situations greatly!”

I’m outside my comfort zone every single day. Some days it’s going out to buy milk, some days it’s having to stand in shower, some days it’s being unable to hold my toothbrush in the morning.

I know my limits and have to break past them all the time to take care of my basic needs. 

Even worse is if you blackmail me to “encourage” me to do things. I don’t get enough material things or social interaction in the first place, don’t offer me those only in exchange for “effort” or  work i’m unable to do without breaking myself.

And those who tell me I shouldn’t take some medications (addictive pain relief, antidepressants etc), that’s a disgusting attitude. Please shut up. Eating superfoods and jogging and listening to music and meditating might help for your headaches and slumps but I’m ACTUALLY ILL. Positive thinking is really oppressive to people who have it worse.